The world's trusted guide to sustainable and ethical fashion

The world's trusted guide to sustainable and ethical fashion


These Brands Make the Best Ethical, Sustainable, Non-Toxic Pajamas and Sleepwear

Image credit: Coyuchi
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When it comes to pajamas and sleepwear, you’ll want to prioritize organic, natural fabric. Not only are you going to be spending a third of your life in your PJs, but during sleep is when your body performs its most important recovery and healing processes, so you don’t want any toxic chemicals involved.

Whether you’re looking for standard comfy sweats, chic sleepshirts, or spacious, flowy nightgowns, we’ve rounded up the best ethical, sustainable, organic pajamas and sleepwear brands below.

(Are you looking for work-from-home apparel? We have a special guide to that here.)

What to Look for in Eco-Friendly Pajamas and Sleepwear

Natural Fabrics: The brands below use natural, low-impact fabrics like organic cotton, bamboo, hemp, and linen. These natural fibers don’t wreak as much havoc on the environment when they’re washed or thrown out at the end of their life.

Non-Toxic: Choose brands that create non-toxic products that are processed and dyed without harmful chemicals. Look for labels like OEKO-TEX, bluesign, and GOTS.

Environmentally-conscious manufacturing: The processes involved in creating textiles are often pretty harsh on the environment, using lots of water, chemicals, and energy, and leaving behind waste. Look for brands that are using more earth-friendly processes that reduce their impact.

Fair labor and transparency: As with everything you buy, check for fair labor practices. Look for brands that prioritize transparency (do they tell you where their apparel is made?) and certifications like Fair Trade and SA8000.

(In the market for eco-friendly undies too? Check out this post.)

Here are our favorite brands making ethical and sustainable pajamas and sleepwear:

 

YesAnd

YesAnd sells eco-friendly, sustainable, and affordable woman’s clothing. Its modern basics are GOTS-certified and made using 100% organic cotton and low-impact dyes. The brand is also committed to fair wages, empowering female farmers, sustaining their local communities, and no child labor. YesAnd’s pajamas selection ranges from tunic, shorts, dresses, and long sleeves. Now through February, the brand is offering an exclusive discount. Use code ECPJ22 for 22 percent off!

 

Maylyn & Co

Maylyn & Co. is a slow fashion brand that creates vegan sleepwear and pillowcases out of moisture-wicking, PETA-approved fabrics, such as Lotus silk, a natural flower fiber, and organic Modal. Its silk is grown and handpicked from sustainable family farms in Iran, the founder’s home country. The fabric is then transported via ocean freight to Maylyn & Co’s family-owned studio in the north of Toronto, where the clothing is finished, and packaged using eco-friendly materials, such as biodegradable bags and vegan glues. No single-use plastic is in any of Maylyn & Co.’s packaging, and any fabric leftovers in production are turned into scrunchies, sleep masks, and other accessories. Use code ECOCULT at checkout for a 15% discount storewide. Free shipping to U.S. and Canada.

 

Thought

Thought’s pieces are made from natural, sustainable yarns that use less water, fewer pesticides, and create less CO2. That includes bamboo, Lenzing’s EcoVero viscose, and organic cotton. It also upcycles its leftover fabric at the source to reduce waste and create new products. Thought packs its garments in zero-plastic packaging and only uses slow shipping for the lowest carbon footprint.

 

People Tree 

A sustainable fashion pioneer, People Tree has been partnering with Fair Trade producers, garment workers, artisans, and farmers in the developing world to produce ethical and eco-fashion collections for over 25 years. People Tree’s sleepwear is certified Fair Trade and organic and comes in multiple fun prints.

 

Sudara 

Sudara is a certified B Corp that started out in 2006 by partnering with a sewing center in India to teach six women how to sew a pattern for loungewear pants it calls Punjammies®. It now has multiple sewing partnerships across India and the US, where it employs hundreds of women who have transitioned out of sex slavery. Sudara’s pajamas come in a flowy fit and unique, beautiful prints.

 

Hanna Andersson

Hanna Andersson mostly makes clothing for babies and kids, but it also has a selection of matching family PJs that are just too cute to leave off this list. Everything is made out of organic cotton that is OEKO-TEX-certified non-toxic and comes in all kinds of different designs, including collections with your favorite Disney, Pixar, and Marvel heroes.

 

ettitude 

Ettitude’s PJs are made from 100% OEKO-TEX certified Bamboo Lyocell, which means it’s low impact, toxin-free, and super soft. Its bamboo is also sourced from FSC-certified sustainable forests and made in a closed-loop system that recycles 98% of water.

 

Amour Vert 

Amour Vert (which means ‘green love’ in French) creates sleepwear that’s made from low-impact fabrics like organic cotton, cupro, Modal and more. It also develops zero-waste designs and works directly with mills to develop its own fabrics that are sustainable, soft, and stand the test of time. Almost 100% of Amour Vert’s products are made in California, most within just a few miles of its San Francisco office. The brand is also one of the first companies to use compostable protective bags to store and ship its garments and is committed to only using packaging made from recycled materials and printed with soy-based inks. Plus, Amour Vert plants a tree with each purchase of a tee.

 

Boody 

Born in Australia, Boody is a basics brand that uses organic bamboo textiles throughout its range of underwear, activewear, and loungewear, including its PJs, which are made from sustainably-sourced natural bamboo with a closed-loop water system and non-toxic solvents. Workers are paid a living wage and garments are sewn in a way that significantly reduces fabric waste. Boody also uses recycled cardboard and vegetable-based ink for its packaging.

 

The Sleep Shirt 

The Sleep Shirt is a Canadian company that makes stylish, comfortable sleepwear that’s produced locally and ethically in Vancouver. The brand uses natural materials like cotton, linen, and some cashmere to create its sleep shirts, which can double as chic resort wear or beachwear as well.

 

Symbology 

Symbology partners with marginalized artisans in developing countries to create handcrafted pieces using traditional fabric techniques like block printing, tie-dye, and embroidery. It merges artisanal fabric techniques with fashion-forward designs, giving its customers a one-of-a-kind item. Most of its pajamas are made from Modal and organic cotton.

 

Coyuchi 

Founded in 1991, Coyuchi’s products begin with 100% organic fibers and a traceable supply chain. It relies on guidelines set by the USDA National Organic Program, GOTS, Fairtrade USA, the Textile Exchange, and the International Labor Organization to ensure the products are made to the most sustainable and ethical standards. Its pajamas are made from 100% GOTS certified organic cotton that is grown in Turkey and woven in Portugal. Coyuchi is also a member of 1% for the Planet, and it works with Fibershed to source Climate Beneficial wool. 

 

Sunday Morning

Sunday Morning’s sleepwear is made from 100% French Linen, which is soft, durable, and breathable. Its robes are stonewashed for a vintage-like feel that gets better with every laundry day. Everything is made ethically and sustainably, and 10% of profits are given to build homes in developing countries through New Story.

 

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