ecomoney
This post appeared first on Leotie Lovely, an ever-evolving guide to living more consciously.

There are various subjects on this path towards a greater state of eco-wisdom and ethical awareness which provide a sense of activism – none easier nor more effective than directly pulling your funds from the root of the problems themselves. In many cases this means making alternative purchases when it comes to food, clothing, beauty and so on, but up until now I hadn’t thought about the negative impacts of where I keep my money before I spend it.

The banking system was born in 1406, instigated by the Ancient Greeks and Romans to protect the funds of the public during troubled times. Back then, both ancient powers were quite adamantly Christian and thus their systems were based on the anti-materialism of Jesus. All banking was done ethically and any form of “Usura” (high-interest lending) was considered immoral (one of those seven sins of the deadly variety is GREED).

Today most investments would be considered immoral by the Greeks and Romans who set the standards with ethics rather than profits alone in mind. Currently, conventional banks are among the biggest investors in the causes of climate change. Almost all of the big banks we’re familiar with (and likely do our banking with) have been accused of tax avoidance, financing the arms trade and investing in oil and nuclear industries, amongst other evils.

Up until recently, apart from keeping your cash in a shoebox under the bed, there weren’t many alternatives available. But in the past years, Ethical Banks around the world have begun to appear, investing themselves and their client’s funds in the environment, animal rights, social programs, impact investments, corporate social responsibility and more.

Read the entire article here.

This post appeared first on Leotie Lovely, an ever-evolving guide to living more consciously.