In the course of my spending an unhealthy amount of time on the internet, I come across great ethical and sustainable brands I wasn't aware of. For the sake of efficiency (mine and yours!) I put them into a monthly roundup. Enjoy!

Want: Lam & Co. 

Lam & Co. lam2
Lam and Co. sells Fair Trade, crocheted bikinis, tops, and other fashion. Founder Lily-Anne Markham is an alum of the fair fashion brand People Tree UK, and now works with craftswoman in Zimbabwe, paying fair wages for their handcrafted, charming goods.

Love: Soko

soko // fair trade jewelry Soko has developed the first mobile-driven value chain that enables artisans to engage the international marketplace, even if they lack access to the internet, a computer, or a bank account. They offer market access and training to expand economic opportunity for artisans, the majority of whom are women in underserved communities in Kenya. On average, within two months of joining Soko, artisans increase their incomes by a factor of 4x! The result is modern, ethical jewelry that is handmade from sustainable materials.

Want: Jungle Gurl 

Jungle Girl bikinis are made from upcycled vintage textiles Jungle Girl bikinis are made from upcycled vintage textiles
Former model/actress/designer Natalie Golonka takes vintage garments (dresses, shirts, pants) and transforms them into fresh, one-of-a-kind bikinis and men's board shorts.

Love: Linden

Linden // sustainable fashion Locally made, eco-conscious brand Linden is dedicated to maintaining a low-carbon footprint while delivering high quality, fashion forward garments in a sleek and minimalist style. They seek out textiles that are environmentally sound, considering both the impact to make the materials, as well as the impact these materials have at the end of the lifecycle. They try to source as much locally as possible, unless it just isn't made here.

Love: Riley & Coco

Riley & Coco sells LA-made fashion Riley & Coco sells LA-made fashion
An online boutique featuring chic Los Angeles-based designers and entrepreneurs that are making an impact on the West Coast community. Look around and you'll see some sustainably made items, like the modal pants pictured above.

Love: Manos Zapotecas

manos_main Manos Zapotecas tries to feature and further the beautiful traditions and superb artistry of the Zapotec people of Oaxaca, Mexico by connecting them with socially conscious consumers around the globe. All of the handwoven bags are handmade from start to finish using Zapotec traditions from wool shorn from sheep raised on the surrounding mountains in Oaxaca, Mexico. The designers work closely with the weavers to incorporate traditional handwoven tribal designs with modern styles.

Want: Ways of Change

Way of Change fair trade jewelry Ways of Change is an ethically sourced fashion brand that offers fair wages to refugees so that they may support and empower themselves through entrepreneurship while sustaining and building upon their traditional skills. Where possible, their products are made from upcycled, organic, natural, cruelty-free, fairly traded and locally sourced materials. A portion of all Ways of Change’s profits are used to support community projects that focus on empowerment and sustainable living, contributing to the positive change that the communities we work with wish to see. In the long-term, Ways of Change hopes to provide support to refugees as they become repatriated (return to their country of origin), resettled (settled into a third country) or integrated into local communities (where they are currently living).

Need: Petite Posy

posy2 I had the pleasure of meeting a friend of a friend this past weekend who owns Petite Posy, a flower delivery business that delivers $25 bouquets of flowers wrapped in 100% biodegradable packaging, to your home or office in Manhattan, Monday through Friday. The slightly smaller-than-average arrangements (they're $25, that's fair!) are meant to bring a spark of seasonal and fresh blooms to you that will last much longer than those sad bodega flowers!