Threads for Thought Cofounders Eric and Leigh Fleet

Threads for Thought Co-Founders Eric and Leigh Fleet

Take this for a romance: Boy meets girl. Boy and girl are both concerned about world issues. Boy and girl start company making conscious t-shirts. Boy and girl get married, and  change the world.

Eric and Leigh Fleet met in high school, and out of their happy union comes this casual cool company. Originally just producing conscious tees with messages of peace, Threads for Thought has expanded to a whole line of ethically and sustainably made casual and comfortable clothing for men and women–perfect for layering on before you head to a fall brunch with your honey.

Threads for Thought has worked closely since its founding with two highly effective charities: the International Rescue Committee (the IRC) and the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC). Their clothing can be found all over NYC at Bloomingdale’s, Whole Foods and Macy’s, and of course online on the Threads for Thought website.

Co-founder Eric let me have a peek into their sustainable NYC lifestyle, and as you’ll see, he might originally be a Jersey boy, but he’s got good taste!

What’s your favorite NYC restaurant?

Quartino on Bleeker for some great organic pastas and organic wine from the Italian vineyard of the owners. It’s not a fancy place but just a good neighborhood spot. I also have two favorite farm-to-table spots both in the West Village, Blue Hill (their location in Westchester at Stone Barns is even better) and Mas Farmhouse.

Your fave bar?

2nd Floor on Clinton. We are celebrating my wife’s thirtieth birthday there in a few weeks, and it is just a really great place to hang out with amazing cocktails.

Describe your perfect Sunday.

Sunday’s are a day of relaxation, and I have a really wide range of interests. I also am not a huge fan of routine, so I like to change up my Sunday activities. But my overall favorite way to spend a Sunday in NYC would be to wake up a little late because we had a great Saturday night, do some kind of workout, have brunch with my wife and friends, some kind of outdoor activity around the city followed by drinks, dinner and some great Sunday-night HBO.

You can only see one musical artist perform this year–who do you choose?

Jay-Z. I grew up with hip hop and when Jay-Z puts on a show … well, it is usually pretty good.

Your favorite NYC-made brand?

Martin Greenfield suits made in Brooklyn. He’s just one amazing tailor and his suits are fantastic.

You have three days free to get the heck out of the city. Where do you go?

Without a budget, probably somewhere in Italy. Locally, I would probably say Fischer’s Island off of Connecticut, because it is just so remote and away from everything.

Threads for ThoughtWhat’s your biggest, unsustainable bad habit?

I always liked cars growing up and it is hard to shake that. As cool as the Tesla is (and it is really cool) I still like Ferraris better, so hopefully Ferrari comes out with an electric car. (And it would be great to actually be able to afford one when they do.) But for everyday drivers, I completely respect and endorse hybrids and elective vehicles.

Do you ever lecture your friends on their non-green choices?

Sometimes, but I try not to preach. If someone asks for my opinion I am happy to give it to them, but I am not all that preachy about things. Probably because I don’t love it when people try to do it to me.

What do you find most challenging about living sustainably? 

I really don’t find it all that challenging. When given a choice, I try to make the most sustainable one. I also tend to prefer organic and local foods anyway, so it’s not a challenge to seek them out since I enjoy it. Shopping for sustainable clothing would be harder to do, but I wear Threads for Thought at least 90% of the time, so I am fortunate in that respect. I would like to live in a sustainable building, so that is a goal of mine in the future–to either move to or renovate my next home to be as energy efficient as possible.

When it’s yellow, do you let it mellow?

Absolutely not. That’s a little too far for me.